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La Bestia
When cargo trains, called La Bestia, passed by, migrants staying in a shelter in Apizaco stopped and stared.
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Sonrie Sin Limites
Migrants in a shelter in Apizaco sleep under a sign which means, "Smile Without Limits."
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Ronnie
A migrant rests for a few days in an Apizaco shelter.
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Carlos
Carlos, a Salvadoran migrant, at the shelter in La Patrona.
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New Arrivals
Every day, a few migrants showed up in La Patrona.
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Evelyn
Evelyn, a 22 year old Guatemalan, was making her way to the U.S.
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Natalie Reyes
Natalie left Honduras when she was four months pregnant. "If I stayed, we would starve," she said.
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The Road North
Two migrants plan their route north to the U.S.
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English Class
Angela, a volunteer at a shelter in Ixtepec, taught basic English phrases to migrants.
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Chahuites
Morning at the shelter in Chahuites.
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Isamel
Isamel setting the table for lunch.
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Noel
Noel is a 16 year old Salvadoran walking, alone, to the U.S. where he hopes to find a job so he can help his mother who has cancer.
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Maricela and Alberto
Two Nicaraguans hoping to make it to the U.S.
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Migrant
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Migrant-2
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Maricela
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Alfonso
Alfonso lost part of his right arm in an accident at work. Despite this, he was migrating through Mexico to the U.S.
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Alex
A member of La Caravana de los Mutilados, 20 Hondurans who were maimed by La Bestia.
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Reaching El Zocalo
Members of La Caravana de los Mutilados traveled by the Metro to the zocalo, Mexico City's main square.
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I Made It!
Members of La Caravana de los Mutilados traveled by the Metro to the zocalo, Mexico City's main square.

Central American Migration, 2015

I spent seven weeks in Mexico between January and March, 2015. For much of that time, I was in shelters for Central American migrants. Almost half a million migrants pass through Mexico yearly, almost all of them hoping to make it to he U.S. Most come from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador and are fleeing extreme violence and poverty. In the past, they rode the cargo trains collectively known as La Bestia but now are largely prevented from climbing on the train by Mexican Immigration and police, as well as gangs. For more about their journeys, go to: :

http://inthesetimes.com/article/17916/how-the-u.s.-solved-the-central-american-migrant-crisis

http://inthesetimes.com/article/17834/caravan-of-the-mutilated

This portfolio contains images from the following shelters: La Sagrada Familia, Las Patronas and Hermanos en el Camino.